Welcome to Pacific Electric Monograph's guide to significant dates in Pacific History.
August 11
In 1934, the first federal prisoners arrived at the island prison Alcatraz in San Francisco Bay.
In 1945, the Allies responded to Japan's offer to surrender provided Emperor Hirohito retained his sovereignty; the Allies said they would determine the Emperor's future status. Tokyo newspapers began preparing the Japanese for surrender by saying it's the duty of the Japanese people not to commit national suicide. Soviet armies knifed through Manchuria in a giant pincer movement aimed at Harbin, the province's most important road and rail center, racing 155 miles in two days. Other Soviet forces began occupying the Japanese half of Sakhalin, a 550-mile-long island north of Hokkaido.
In 1954, a formal peace took hold in Indochina, ending more than seven years of fighting between the French and Communist Vietminh.
In 1962, the Soviet Union launched cosmonaut Andrian Nikolayev on a 94-hour flight.
In 1965, rioting and looting broke out in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles; in the week that followed, 34 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured.
In 1975, the United States vetoed the proposed admission of North and South Vietnam to the United Nations, following the Security Council's refusal to consider South Korea's application.
In 1994, a federal jury awarded more than 10,000 commercial fishermen $286.8 million for losses suffered as a result of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. The Tenth International Conference on AIDS concluded in Yokohama, Japan.
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The Year at a Glance


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